Advantages of DCS Career

A Lifetime of Benefits

Few other experiences in life have proven to net such a positive and sustainable impact. With study abroad offering so many life-changing and enduring academic, career, intercultural, personal, and social benefits, students should carefully consider studying abroad when searching for a college and during their collegiate career. Students should question potential colleges about the study abroad programs they offer and find out how competitive the application process is and if grades and financial aid transfer. In addition, colleges, parents, and employers should encourage and enable students to study abroad.

Manage Your Own Finances

One major aspect of being an independent adult is having the ability to manage your own finances. Regardless of whether your study abroad program is financed by a scholarship, grant, or another source of income, chances are that it will be your responsibility to pay the bills

Furthermore, living in a new country also forces you to learn to understand a new form of currency, and familiarize yourself with the various living expenses. Understanding how to manage your expenses will especially be beneficial when you no longer rely on the support of your family.

Network for Your Future

In addition to making friends, you can also form professional contacts while abroad. Generally speaking, course loads tend to be comparatively lighter while studying abroad, so this can be an ideal occasion to intern, work part-time, or volunteer while you’re studying.

Consult your college or university to see whether they help you find internships or work placements abroad. Sometimes, you can even get credit from your home institution. When you’re finished working abroad, be sure to ask for a recommendation letter to testify that you worked abroad, and to share with future prospective employers.

Longer Stays Mean Greater Benefits with (DCS Career)

Consistent with national study abroad statistics, the survey found that students are generally studying abroad for a shorter duration, with the number of full-year students declining dramatically. In the 1950s and 1960s, 72 percent of respondents studied for a full year, but only 20 percent of respondents did so in the 1990s. The number of students studying for less than 10 weeks tripled from the 1950s and 1960s to the 1990s.

For many years, conventional wisdom in the study abroad field has been that "more is better" -- the longer students study abroad, the more significant the academic and cultural development and personal growth benefits. According to survey results, the "more is better" idea holds true. However, results of the study also suggest that programs of at least six weeks in duration can also be enormously successful in producing important academic, inter- and intra-personal, career, and intercultural development outcomes. These findings are significant considering the current national increase in students attending shorter programs. Students attending full-year, semester, and summer programs all report the following benefits:

Although all students benefit from the study abroad experience, there are a few choices that students can make that have the potential to increase their long-term language and career benefits.

Education and Career Attainment

It is noteworthy that the majority of respondents gave academic and professional accounts similar to Abramson's. When questioned about academic pursuits, 87 percent of respondents said that study abroad influenced subsequent educational experiences, 63 percent said that it influenced their decision to expand or change academic majors, and 64 percent reported that it influenced their decision to attend graduate school. Nearly half of all respondents have engaged in international work or volunteerism since studying abroad.

Similar to Sengupta's experience, three-quarters of respondents asserted that they acquired skill sets abroad that influenced their career path, and 62 percent said that studying abroad ignited an interest in a career direction pursued after the experience.

Experience a Foreign Culture

It’s one thing to see a photo of Machu Picchu, or to read a travel memoir about the bustling streets of Mumbai. Visiting foreign lands in person, however, is an entirely different experience. When you study abroad, you participate in the day-to-day life of a new locale, gaining a first-hand understanding and new appreciation of the culture. Study abroad educators often assert that one of the goals of study abroad is to train future global leaders to be more effective, respectful of other cultures and political and economic systems, and willing to take a stand for the world's welfare, not just what benefits a specific country. The survey findings indicate that study abroad is succeeding in its mission.

When questioned about intercultural development, 98 percent of respondents said that study abroad helped them to better understand their own cultural values and biases, and 82 percent replied that study abroad contributed to their developing a more sophisticated way of looking at the world. "The experience of living and studying in another country was so eye-opening ... [it] tested preconceptions and habits I wasn't even aware were so ingrained in me," says Cynthia Perras (IES Paris, 1981).

It is significant to note that these intercultural benefits are not fleeting but continue to impact participants' lives long after their time abroad. Almost all of the respondents (94 percent) reported that the experience continues to influence interactions with people from different cultures, and 23 percent still maintain contact with host-country friends. Ninety percent said that the experience influenced them to seek out a greater diversity of friends, and 64 percent said that it also influenced them to explore other cultures.

"It has been nearly ten years since I was a student in Vienna, but not a single day goes by where its impact is not felt in my life," says Jason Thornberg (IES Vienna, 1994). "My time there fundamentally changed how I view the world and has given me the ability to view the world, and its issues, from several perspectives."

Become More Independent

Studying abroad removes you from the normal support network that you are accustomed to back home. While on the one hand, being away from friends and family can seem daunting, it is also a chance for you to hone your own skills and gain some independence.

Whether it’s washing your laundry or buying groceries, you will learn to take responsibility for your actions. When you return home, your increased independence will be very useful – it can help you in your job search, at home, or in your day-to-day routines.

Gain new perspective on the world

DCS Career Study Abroad programs take students through a cultural and academic experience from the inside out. Students explore issues related to globalization, development, poverty, and social inequity from many different perspectives. When they return to the US, students almost always see things differently: They can put themselves in someone else’s shoes more easily and have a more nuanced understanding of the world.

Our advantages

Our Services About DCS Career Useful Info Courses offered Countries
Immigration About us Planing Your Expenses ENGINEERING  USA
Study Visa Our Advantages Types of Visa MANAGEMENT CANADA
Work Visa Immigration Policy Saftey PHD DOCTORATE AUSTRALIA
Career Counselling Immigration Categories Healthcare AVIATION/HOSPITALITY NEWZEALAND
English Test   General Information BANKING & FINANCE UNIED KINGDON
Overseas Recruitment English Test Foreign Culture MEDIA & MASS COMM SINGAPORE
Our services include ILETS Financial Advisor DESIGNING MALAYSIA
Immigration TOFEL   ANIMATION/GAMING U.A.E
International Student GMAT Other RETAIL MANAGEMENT SOUTH AFRICA
Skilled Worker Visa GRE Our Vision MEDICAL SCIENCE IRELAND
Our Commitmrnt to Client SAT Our mission ART/LAW/TEACHING GERMANY
Why Choose Us   Our Values Social Network RUSSIA
Latest News Programes FAQ.s Facebook CYPRUS
Testimonials Specialzed programes List of Ouestion linkedin FRANCE
Photo Gallery All Programes Contact Us Twitter FINLAND
Counteries International Programes Privacy My Space SCOTLAND